Datalogging on Arduino (and compatibles): A comprehensive guide

I’ve used a lot of different configurations of Arduino-related gear as datalogging utilities. So here’s a comprehensive guide on what’s possible, how to set up stuff and on what you can expect regarding accuracy, battery life and logging speed.

arduino_logger_setup.JPG

My Arduino Uno with the datalogger shield both temperature and brightness sensors connected. I used a normal smartphone charger to power it for more than 3 days and placed it in this fireproof baking tray since I felt somewhat unsure about having it running unattended.

Continue reading

Real-time simulations on an Arduino (double pendulum)

I got a small display compatible with my Due for christmas. And since I really wanted to see some arduino-in-the-loop simulations, I decided to use it for exactly this: real-time multibody simulations on the Ardunio and the results displayed on the tft.

Continue reading

Speed comparisons for Arduino Uno/Nano, Due and Teensy 3.5

It’s been more than a year since I published my post on numerical integration on an Arduino. Since then, the post has been quite popular, recieving a steady stream of visitors (mostly via Google). When I originally wrote it, I only had an Arduino Uno at hand – since then I’ve added a couple of Nanos and lately an Arduino Due to my inventory and decided it would be interesting to do a couple of speed tests to see how they perform. The latest addition to my growing circus of microcontroller boards is a Teensy 3.5 board.

As I pointed out in the original post, numerical integration relies heavily on floating-point math – which is something the Arduino’s 8-bit processor is not particularly good at. The Due features a 32-bit processor, a clock frequency of 84 instead of 16 MHz and the possibility to use double (64 bit) instead of float (32 bit) as a data type – so I was curious to see how it would compare to the Arduino Uno. The Nano is supposed to have more or less the same characteristics as an Uno, but is a lot smaller and cheaper – see below for details.

Now added to the comparison, the Teensy 3.5 includes a 32-bit processor with 120 MHz clock speed and a FPU for speedier floating-point math.

Continue reading