Making and forking OpenCola

I’m a huuuuge cola enthusiast, with an appetite for non-mainstream versions (most major brands just taste boring to me). So I wanted to make OpenCola for a long time and finally got around to do so.

It took me several attempts to get the recipe right, but once I did it turned out both very delicious and very easy to make. I ended up modifying the original opencola recipe for my needs and trying several versions, so here’s my summary of what did and didn’t work.

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6 easy tips for creating better result plots and graphics

I’m not only a simulation nerd, I’m also a visualization nerd. My interest in formatting, layout and displays has proven to be extremely helpful in my daily work, where finding the right visual is often key to analyzing and communicating large measurement and simulation datasets. Sometimes, I also find the time to participate in fun events like the recent storytelling with data visualization challenge – which also is a good excuse to write this post on plots and visualization techniques.

So here are some simple tips to get better result plots and graphs. Most of my advice is focused on visuals for simulation results, especially in the context of large datasets and use-cases where you have to plot results frequently (like multibody simulations). This often boils down to getting the workflow right – the most beautiful visuals won’t help when creating them takes more time than what’s available.

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Getting started

This is an experiment that has been bugging me for quite a while.

Every now and then I run into some applied mechanics problem and try to figure out how to solve it. Usually after a few minutes of trying, I also decide to google it and often I find no solution to my question (but usually a lot of helpful hints and good advice).

These are usually quite basic questions I’m considering, like:

  • how can I implement coulomb friction in a 1d mechanics model with consideration of stick and slip states?
  • my multibody model is getting quite complex with lots of reused code. The code would probably look a lot cleaner and simpler if masses and couplings are implemented as objects. How can this be done?

Both example questions are actually quite simple problems which are probably solved many times. Searching for a good solution is fun for me and I usually learn a lot along the way. So this is the idea of this blog: to write about simple problems with multibody dynamics and suggest possible solutions to them – and then see what happens.

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