An Arduino Due-based Oscilloscope and Datalogger

I’ve finally built my Due and TFT into a nice housing and coded a reasonably well-working oscilloscope and datalogger for it. Here’s what I’ve learned along the way!

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The oscilloscope showing analog input and digital output from an Arduino Uno powering a servo motor with the “knob” example sketch from the Arduino servo library.

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Datalogging on Arduino (and compatibles): A comprehensive guide

I’ve used a lot of different configurations of Arduino-related gear as datalogging utilities. So here’s a comprehensive guide on what’s possible, how to set up stuff and on what you can expect regarding accuracy, battery life and logging speed.

(However, please keep in mind that I’m neither particularly skilled with electronics nor programming and other’s know a lot more on this than I do. I’m particularly grateful that Ed Mallon provided a link to this paper he coauthored with Patricia Beddows in the comments – the work and knowledge they put into it is just amazing)

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My Arduino Uno with the datalogger shield both temperature and brightness sensors connected. I used a normal smartphone charger to power it for more than 3 days and placed it in this fireproof baking tray since I felt somewhat unsure about having it running unattended.

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Raspberry pi: Video and Audio recording and streaming guide

I’ve spent some time on setting up audio and video streaming on my raspberry pi (mostly used as a baby monitor right now). While there are great ressources out there, it took me a lot of effort to find them and put everything together. So here’s a handy list of instructions if you want to:

  • Record and stream audio
  • Record and stream both audio and video into one file
  • Are just looking for an introduction into the topic.

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DIY glowing lamp with shifting colors (Arduino-based and interactive)

This post is not really about multibody dynamics. Instead of simulating stuff, I’ve actually built something: A glowing, more-or-less-interactive lamp.

We are awaiting our first child and with all the things we bought (mostly used), there was a small, adorable lamp. Unfortunately, it had some weird-looking electrics inside (both looking very old and labeled for 120V – so it wouldn’t work with our 230V here in Germany), so we decided to remove all cables and replace them with LEDs. Actually, WE just decided not to use the existing cables and then I talked my wife into letting me build something with an Arduino.

So I hooked up the lamp with a digital LED-stripe – I found one that came with digitally-adressable LEDs and used the Adafruit Neopixel library to adress those. Now there are 24 RGB-LEDs inside the lamp which I can control direct with the Arduino.

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Programming advice for an engineer: Get an Arduino

Until the beginning of this year, I’ve only been coding in Matlab, GNU Octave and a few other comparable high-level 4th generation programming languages. I’ve long wanted to learn a more basic programming language which allows smaller and faster programs (more on this in another post). Basically, I wanted an answer to the question:

I’m an engineer and want to learn about programming. What can I do to get started?

It turns out one of the best answers is this: Get an Arduino.

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